McClose Up…Genius or a McStake?

mcdonalds-unbranded-big-mac-hed-2013    mcdonalds-unbranded-3

Branding Branding Branding is essential to the success of any business.  You might think you have hit it big time when you can afford ditch your branding efforts and create a major advertising campaign around close ups of your foods. If you were a McDonald’s ad executive that seems to be the case.  Introducing the McCloseUp campaign: to capitalize on the recent trend of food porn.

Maybe in the 1950’s this wouldn’t be so risky. McDonald’s after all was revolutionizing the restaurant industry and changed the farming and food distribution business. Opened in 1940 by brother’s Dick and Murice (Mac), McDonald’s populated Route 66 in San Bernardio California. The brother’s noticed that almost all of their profits were coming from the sale of their hamburgers so they created the “Speedee Service System” of food preparation. The end result, they were able to reduce the cost of creating the burgers and create a franchise business.  In fact their 100 millionth hamburger was served shortly after in 1958.  Source [http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe50s/life_16.html]

Fast forward to today and the National Restaurant Association says that the American sales of fast food totaled $163.5 billion dollars in 2005. McDonalds grew in 2005 5.6 percent globally with 30,000 franchised stores in more than 120 countries. Source [http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/edible-innovations/fast-food3.htm]

Is this a risky move for McDonald’s to eliminate the golden arches in their advertisements? Or is their food so well known it won’t make a difference? Is their hamburger so recognizable that 100% of the time the consumer knows McDonald’s? Perhaps the signature Big Mac isn’t easily mistakable but what about the Sundae?

According to the Toronto Star, Sharon Aschaiek suggests that your brand isn’t your logo but your companies identity which consists of differentiating your message, knowing your competition, targeting your audience creating your vision and bringing it all together.  With that all said, I think this is a major fail for the restaurant giant. Targeted campaign? Nope. Differentiation? Not really… it’s rather boring. Anyone can close up their food. Maybe that’s what they would have done ran a campaign called “your McCloseUp” featuring their customers from around the world eating their product. Obviously the product would look the same, but who is eating it…. Wouldn’t that create a buzz?

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 thoughts on “McClose Up…Genius or a McStake?

  1. Doug Brown says:

    I would suggest that your brand is more than your company’s identity…. it’s your promise to your customers. Identities can be stretched and interpreted and appropriated, which leads to all the brand schizophrenia we see out there. But a promise is either kept or it isn’t. In the case of McDonald’s, the arches aren’t what they promise to their customers – it’s just a visual ID. They probably are big enough to fly without it in tactical situations as long as their core promise doesn’t change. It might make their customers think something fundamental in the promise has changed though – that’s the real risk. Such a great post Avery!

    • Avery_Graham says:

      Thanks Doug! I completely agree with the promise. In my opinion it is the promise and predictability of getting exactly what you want regardless of where you are in the world that keeps me coming back. Sometimes when you travel to Europe it is nice to have a familiar meal that reminds you of home.

      – Avery

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: